Poetry

A Day of Jewish Poetry and Poets Sunday, March 1, 2015

Website: http://bit.ly/1BMSD4x A Day of Jewish Poetry and Jewish Poets Sunday 1 March 2015 The Liberal Jewish Synagogue 10:30am – 5:15pm Contact name/email:Sue Bolsom – suebolsom@gmail.com The LJS Year of Poetry – 2015 Inaugural Event Sunday 1st March 2015 Shirat Ha-am (Song of the People):  A Day of Jewish Poetry and Jewish Poets Click HERE for more… Continue reading A Day of Jewish Poetry and Poets Sunday, March 1, 2015

Drama

J is For Jewish Dramatists

One would wish that Mr. Billington had gone further with this article,  but if he had, maybe he would hve stolen my thunder.  His distinction between dramatists who are Jewish, who resist being labelled “Jewish” and Jewish dramatists–writers who “derive their vitality from their cultural specificity”–is hardly fresh, it is one of the distinctions that it… Continue reading J is For Jewish Dramatists

Academic

The Promised Land: Utopia and Dystopia in Contemporary British-Jewish Culture

Utopia and Dystopia Conference July 2015 The Promised Land: Utopia and Dystopia in Contemporary British-Jewish Culture One-Day Conference, Thursday 23 July Open University Regional Centre, Camden, London The conference is hosted and funded by the Postcolonial Literatures Research Group of the Open University, with additional support from the British Jewish Contemporary Culture research network, Bangor… Continue reading The Promised Land: Utopia and Dystopia in Contemporary British-Jewish Culture

Academic

The Promised Land: Utopia and Dystopia in Contemporary British-Jewish Culture

One-Day Conference, Thursday 23 July Open University Regional Centre, Camden, London The conference is hosted and funded by the Postcolonial Literatures Research Group of the Open University, with additional support from the British Jewish Contemporary Culture research network, Bangor University and the University of Winchester. Judaism can be seen as a utopian religion: the Promised… Continue reading The Promised Land: Utopia and Dystopia in Contemporary British-Jewish Culture